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5 Tips on What It Means To Study in Luxembourg

Luxembourg may be a small country on the map but its world is as vast as it could get. Over here, you are blessed with an environment culturally beautiful and distinct, a lifestyle utterly urbane, and bountiful of natural giveaways. Due to it being sandwiched between Belgium, France, and Germany, it has gleaned a lot from their cultures and has intermingled the takeaways with its own to offer a blend so exquisite in its own way. No wonder it is a postcard-perfect country for anyone who visits it. That being said, I wonder whether you knew that Luxembourg has an excellent Higher Education System. It is highly diverse and attracts students from all over the world. Most Luxembourgish universities are highly coveted in the region and have associations with the world’s best. So, if you want to experience something rich, beautiful, and intellectual, then Luxembourg makes up for a good choice. But, I cannot let you decide without giving you more inputs on what awaits you. Luxembourg may be a welcoming country but it has its own system you must take note of. I have noted down a few of those things you should know about studying in Luxembourg. 1.Highly subsidized education Exorbitant tuition fees are a common feature in European universities. However, Luxembourg offers huge relief to its students through a highly systematic subsidized higher education system. A typical tuition fee falls between €200 to €400 per semester. Moreover, there is a gradual reduction in the tuition fee with every semester. There is, however, discretion granted to universities to determine their respective fee structure for students coming from outside the European Union, but this is to be expected as those from European Union are extended concessionary treatment. 2. Top Universities in Luxembourg There are a number of universities you can consider attending. The country’s most prestigious universities are, however, the University of Luxembourg, Sacred Heart University, and Lunex University. Other universities of great repute include the BBI Luxembourg, Cass Institute, United Business Institute, and Luxembourg School of Business. All of these universities are internationally recognized and have been designated as world-class centers of education. This is evident from the fact that it is part of Bologna’s Process that is in itself a stamp of excellence on institutions. 3.The language will most likely not be a problem Another woe of international students is the language. Fortunately, you will not find many problems in Luxembourg. Over here, there are 3 official languages namely, German, French, and Luxembourgish. All of these languages are very commonly used in local life. However, lately, many universities have revised their coursework and begun administering it in English. This change has drawn significant attention from students across the globe and has contributed to the rise in the number of applications every year. 4.Scholarship opportunities No matter how much subsidized the tuition fees are, Luxembourg is not necessarily an inexpensive country. You may want to cut down on your expenses through several means, and scholarships are of course popularly opted for. While there are universities that offer their own scholarship schemes to applicants, there is a handful offered by the government. Of course, the coverage will vary from one scheme to another, so you will need to do research. A few scholarships offered are John Monash Scholarships, Postdoctoral Fellowship Programme, and Education Future International Scholarship. 5.The overall cost of living Keeping aside the tuition fee, there is quite a sum you will shell out every month on the necessities. Monthly rent for a single room apartment can cost you up to €1200. However, many universities provide for their respective accommodation facilities and rent them out to students. These accommodation facilities are less expensive and can cost up to €600. Public transport is free for everyone and is highly accessible so you can cross the transportation costs except when you are traveling first-class. Healthcare costs may add up but it is advised that you come along with health insurance to minimize the financial burden. Also, prefer eating indoors. Cook your meals and save tons of money because eating out is generally not inexpensive in the country.

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Schooling options in Luxembourg City

If you relocate to Luxembourg with kids, you will probably need to find an international school, where classes are taught in English. Here is a list of international schools in Luxembourg that you should consider for your children. St. George’s International School, Luxembourg  St George’s International School offers an English curriculum to over 850 students of 60 different nationalities. The school educates pupils aged from 3 years to 18+ years. It follows the British curricula: A-Levels, IGCSE (International General Certificate of Secondary Education), the National Curriculum for England, and has received accreditation from the Council of British International Schools (COBIS). The school is located near the City Centre, in Hamm.  International School of Luxembourg  The International School of Luxembourg offers classes in English to 1300 pupils. Campus Geesseknapchen is located in the Hollerich district of Luxembourg City. The school follows the following curricula: Adapted or School-Developed; Curriculum IGCSE (International General Certificate of Secondary Education); the International Baccalaureate Diploma. The ICL is accredited by the Council of International Schools (CIS) and the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.   Waldorf School of Luxembourg  The Waldorf School of Luxembourg provides multi-lingual education for pupils aged from 4 years to 18 years: pre-school classes are taught in Luxembourgish; primary school is taught in German, French, and English; secondary school classes are in French. The school follows these curricula: the Adapted or School-Developed Curriculum, the National Curriculum for England, and is accredited to offer the French International Baccalaureate Diploma. The school is located in Limpertsberg.  Maria Montessori School, Luxembourg   Maria Montessori School is a French and German nursery and primary school that teaches pupils aged from 4 years to 12 years. It follows the Montessori curriculum and is located in a villa with beautiful grounds in Strassen.  OTR International School  The OTR International School boasts a multicultural environment, with pupils aged from 3 years to 15 years. It follows two curricula: for primary school-the Adapted or School-Developed Curriculum; for secondary school: the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme.  The school is situated in Val Ste Croix.  Lycée -International School Michel Lucius  Lycée Michel Lucius is a state school that teaches pupils aged from 4 years to 18 years. Since 2011, the Lycée offers classes in English, where the Luxembourgish state school curriculum is followed. Knowledge of the Luxembourgish language is mandatory. The school is situated in the Limpertsberg district of Luxembourg City.  European School Luxembourg  The school is meant to reflect the multicultural and multilingual structure of the European Union. That is why, at this international school, classes are thought, depending on the section, in English, French, German, Czech, Danish, Greek, Italian, and Hungarian. The curricula followed are the Adapted or School-Developed Curriculum and the European Baccalaureate. The school has two campuses, one in Kirchberg and the other in Mamer.  Lycée Vauban  Lycée Vauban offers classes in French and follows the French National Curriculum. It teaches children ages from 3 years to 18 years. It offers two diplomas, the French Bac and the French Diplôme National de Brevet. The school is situated in Gasperich.

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Guide to setting-up-your-home-in-luxembourg/

Relocating to Luxembourg and setting up a home comes with its challenges. Here are some suggestions to help you with getting your household going. Connect to Internet, television, and telephone If you are renting your accommodation in Luxembourg, the Internet, television, and telephone might already be included in the rent. If that is not the case, you can get a package deal from one of the Luxembourg providers. Bear in mind that it will take a while to get an appointment with a provider. If you know the details of your rental agreement before arriving in Luxembourg, try getting an appointment with a provider before you arrive in the country, just to make sure that you will have Internet when you move in. Electricity, gas, and fuel oil (mazout) You can continue with the providers that the owner or previous tenant has already contracted, or you can engage a different provider. You can choose an electricity provider from this list and a gas provider from this one. In Luxembourg, standard home electrical sockets are 220 volts AC and use the European two-pin plug. Don’t forget to buy an adaptor for the electrical goods you have brought from other countries that have different voltages. You can follow the steps listed on the Creos Luxembourg website on how to get a new electricity or gas supplier. Contact them for emergency services and troubleshooting as well. Bear in mind that many households in Luxembourg do not use natural gas for the heating systems but fuel oil, the so-called mazout. Search online for a mazout company that services your area and can home deliver the fuel oil for you. Water In Luxembourg, tap water is safe to drink. When you move in, contact the Water Service (Service des Eaux) of your municipality (commune) to get a water supply contract. Notify them about your move-in date and the number on the water meter on the date of your move-in. Waste In Luxembourg, waste bins are color-coded: Grey for general waste; Blue for paper waste; Brown or green (depending on your area) for glass; Green or brown (depending on your area) for organic matter. Charges depend on collection frequency and weight. However, you can also recycle glass, paper, plastic, and batteries at public collection stations. Also, for plastic, tins, and cartons, you can sign up with Valorlux, a municipality service that provides recycling bags that will be picked up periodically. Insurance In Luxembourg, health and car insurance is mandatory. Although not mandatory, it is highly advisable to het an elective home insurance as well. Health insurance All Luxembourgish citizens and all residents who are employed or self employed in Luxembourg and their family are covered for basic healthcare through CNS- Luxembourg (The National Health Fund.) EU citizens can use their European Health Insurance Card for emergency treatment. Foriegn residents who do not work in Luxembourg and do not pay for social security need to get private health insurance. Car insurance If you live in Luxembourg, it is mandatory to have car insurance for your vehicle, called Responsabilité Civile auto, which intervenes when you are involved in an accident that resulted in damages to a third party. There are two types of car insurance: • Third-Party Insurance (Assurance au tiers)– the basic insurance, which intervenes when you are involved in an accident that resulted in damages to a third party. • A Complete Insurance (Assurance tous risques) or Casco- covers you in cases of accidents, fire, ice, theft, and damage to the car. Home insurance Building insurance is not mandatory in Luxembourg. However, for your protection, it is advisable to buy Home Insurance (Assurance Habitation) to cover you in case of natural disasters (earthquakes, fires, floods), vandalism, theft.

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Top neighborhoods for corporate housing in Luxembourg

Luxembourg City is one of the official capitals of the European Union and one of its financial and tech hubs. Almost half its population comes from abroad to be employed in one of the European institutions or the financial sector. If you are relocating to Luxembourg, you are faced with the dilemma of finding a new home in a market famous for its scarcity and its high prices. Given the strict regulations that come with long-term rentals in Luxembourg, your best choice is to settle first in a corporate serviced apartment in Luxembourg City, in an area close to your place of business. Here are a few tips on the most desirable neighborhoods of Luxembourg City and how to choose the one that works best for you. What to look for in a neighborhood If you are relocating to Luxembourg for a job, you need to look for accommodation in one of the central districts, close to the financial and political heart of the city. Although at first glance the city centre seems to be a landscape of skyscrapers, you can find here many leafy neighborhoods, with rows of classical buildings situated on tranquil lanes. A good neighborhood for corporate housing needs to have easy access to shops, cafés, restaurants, gyms, and parks. If you relocate to Luxembourg with your kids, you need to consider what schools and kindergartens you can find in that area. Luxembourg City has many international schools but also schools that offer teaching in one or all of the national languages: German, French, and Luxembourgish. Check in advance if the neighborhood in which you want to settle has an international school, with classes taught in English.  Top neighborhoods for corporate housing in Luxembourg There are several districts in central Luxembourg City where you can find all these amenities, namely Kirchberg, Belair, Limpertsberg, Ville Haute, and Gare. You can even venture outside the City Centre, in the southern quarters of Cloche d’Or and Gasperich. Kirchberg– is the financial, institutional, and cultural heart of Luxembourg City. It has a mall, the Kirchberg Shopping Center, where you can find everything from shoe shops to a food court. The Philharmonie concert hall and the MUDAM, the museum of contemporary art, are also located here. If you want to keep fit you can do it at the d’Coque, with its impressive Olympic-size swimming pool, or go to one of the many fitness centers in the neighborhood. Kirchberg is unique in the multitude of international schools that are located here that offer classes taught in English from primary school to university level. Choose your Luxembourg short-term apartment in this neighborhood and you will be well equipped to start your new life in the Duchy. Belair- is one of the most tranquil districts of Luxembourg City. Rows of ritzy family homes with gardens make this quarter one of the most sought-after neighborhoods in the city. Renting a corporate apartment in Belair comes with proximity to supermarkets Lidl and Delhaise but also with a range of specialty shops, where you can pick up your bread or wine. There are several schools that have classes in English, such as the International School of Luxembourg. Limpertsberg- is a peaceful residential neighborhood situated near Kirchberg. The district is home to many schools, some of them international, such as the Waldorf School. This district is ideal for family life, less so for shopping or going out. However, its central location and proximity to the financial quarter make it an ideal neighborhood where to choose your first corporate flat in Luxembourg. Ville Haute and Gare- are two adjacent central districts of Luxembourg City. Rental prices in these areas come at a premium. They have the greatest concentration of restaurants, cafés, and nightclubs in Luxembourg City. These quarters are ideal for outgoing people, who enjoy sharing the buzz of an active city. Cloche d’Or– is one of the newest and the greenest quarters of Luxembourg City. This is a place of sleek modern architecture where you can find a vast shopping center, the Cloche d’Or. Here you can find everything from your new outfit to the ingredients on your grocery list. Renting your Luxembourg serviced apartment in this area will ensure that you enjoy all the amenities of a newly built neighborhood. Gasperich- boasts the presence of the largest park in the city, the Parc de Gasperich, but also the biggest shopping center in the country, the Cloche d’Or, which it shares with its neighbor. The architecture of the quarter is made mainly of modern apartment buildings. All schools in this district are either French or Luxembourgish, so pupils wanting to study in English would have to commute to the neighboring quarters. Choose Gasperich for your Luxembourg corporate housing if you want to enjoy the amenities of modern architecture in a vibrant neighborhood. These are neighborhoods that fit best the requirements of an ideal corporate flat in Luxembourg City. They are in the city center or with easy access to Kirchberg, the financial and political centre. Settle here for your first months in Luxembourg and choose a serviced apartment as your base in the city.

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Top 8 Facebook Groups to Join when You Move to Luxembourg

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg might be one of the smallest countries in the world but it’s also one of the richest. Many European and international institutions have their headquarters in the Duchy that also attracts professionals from banking and high tech industries. Moving to a new country requires a lot of research from those about to embark on such an adventure. Moving to Luxembourg is no different. If you are planning to relocate to Luxembourg, you need to get up to speed with its lifestyle and culture. Also, you are probably looking for a new place to live. Joining a Facebook group can help you find your way in this new country and even make some new acquaintances. Facebook groups dedicated to expats usually function like notice boards, where you can find job offers, rentals, advice on topical problems (from how to find a school for your kids on what to wear to a wedding in Luxembourg), and a thriving market (people selling and buying things that they don’t need anymore). Here are the top 8 Facebook groups you should join when you plan your move to Luxembourg: Visit Luxembourg should be your first port of call if you are one of the many professionals relocating to Luxembourg. It gives you a glimpse into the life of people who have already made Luxembourg their home. You can learn more about how they settled into their new life and what they are getting up to in their spare time. Join this lively community and share your own adventures in the Duchy! Just Arrived Luxembourg aims to guide people through their Luxembourg relocation. Here you can find anything from job opportunities, to real estate advice, advice on the local legal system and how to choose your insurance, travel tips, relocation services in Luxembourg, how to start a business in Luxembourg, transportation, what’s going on in the cultural life of the city, and much more. Luxembourg Expats Lu is a private group with more than 40k members. The group offers all sorts of information and functions like a sort of dedicated newspaper for the expat community in Luxembourg. It’s a meeting place, where you can get to know new people and make some friends in your new country. It’s also a marketplace, a pinboard for job adverts, as well as a place to advertise real estate, housing and renovation posts.  This is the place where you might find your new accommodation in Luxembourg, or at least get an idea about the real estate market. À louer et à vendre Luxembourg LU, which stands for “For rent and for sale in Luxembourg”, is a similar group, with 8,4k members. In spite of its French name, the group has posts both in French and English and seems to be preferred by young professionals moving to Luxembourg who are looking for a place to rent. If you are a professional relocating to Luxembourg, it’s definitely worth a look. City Savvy Luxembourg styles itself as an ‘online lifestyle magazine in English’. Here you can find a trove of information that will help you to adjust and thrive in your new country. You can take the pulse of the city and learn what cafés and restaurants are all the hype at the moment, where you can try fun activities with your kids, what exhibitions and concerts are on, get travel and sports advice, or school recommendations. If you are relocating to Luxembourg, you should definitely join this group. International Ladies in Luxembourg is a public group that reunites more than 2k members. Here you can find posts about every imaginable topic: job ads, parenting classes, activities for kids, school recommendations, gym and sports tips. You can also find the odd rental ad, which might be helpful when you prepare your move and are looking to rent a furnished apartment in Luxembourg. What’s On for Kids is the online community you need to join if you are relocating to Luxembourg with kids.  Here you can find school and kindergarten recommendations, information about camps and kids sports, or simply get some ideas about what to do with your kids for a fun weekend. The Lux Life has as its main purpose to ‘review all the things to do, buy, and eat in Luxembourg’, so this is the place where you can find recommendations for restaurants, dental practices, gift shops, beauty salons, book clubs, hotels, but also advice about schools and parenting. Definitely worth a look if you are relocating to Luxembourg. Most of these groups are joined by people who are looking for apartments for rent in Luxembourg City. Here you can find something for all pockets, from shared apartments to high-end corporate serviced flats in Luxembourg City. If you are a professional relocating to Luxembourg, you might need to find a short-term, serviced accommodation for your first months in Luxembourg. Getting a fully serviced apartment in Luxembourg would allow you to settle in your job and start looking for your new home in the Duchy. So, join one of these groups and prepare for your move to Luxembourg and the adventure of finding a new home and forging a new life.

Business

Jakub from On-Lang, the online language school in today's Featured Story Series

At Luxembourg Expats Network Featured Story Series’, today we are speaking to Jacob, founder of the online language institute On-Lang. Every entrepreneur's journey is filled with hope and opportunities and struggles and turbulence. By speaking, we not only highlight the journey of an entrepreneur, but we also hope this would be an inspiration for many. Without further ado, let’s jump right-in to our discussions with Jacob. Welcome to LuxExpats FSS, Jacob, let’s have a brief introduction about yourself: My name is Jakub. I am a language teacher with 10+ years of experience. Married to another great education specialist Eveline, who works as methodologist in our school – On-lang. We come from Poland, both worked as freelance teachers there, and at the beginning of 2021 we founded On-lang language school in Bitburg, Germany What's your Bitburg story? What brought you to Bitburg, and how has life in Bitburg been? We visited this area a couple of years ago. Our friends invited us. Once we’ve seen Bitburg, Trier, Eifel region, and Luxembourg of course, we thought that it might be a good place to live. Long story short, after just a few years we had a chance and we took it. Life in Bitburg is calm. People are very friendly and helpful, what we as newcomers appreciate a lot. What's your entrepreneurial journey? How did you get started with On-lang, the online language school? It started several years ago. After an adventure as a corporate employee I decided to pursue a career as a freelancer. I wanted to be able to have more influence on how my work, and life looked like. That’s how my company started to exist. For a couple of years I cooperated with various language schools, and managed to build a list of private clients. When we were planning to move to Germany, it was an obvious choice to pursue the teaching career. After analyzing the options, we decided to launch a company – On-lang language school, get some of our friends, who are fantastic educators on board and start building our future. What services do you offer? Who are your target audience? We want to help everyone who wants to learn a foreign language. We offer various learning schemes. One can learn solo, with a friend, or in a group. We are also interested in reaching companies where workers need to improve their communication skills in non-native languages. Having employees who speak a couple of languages fluently and are not scared of using them can really push a business forward, and we have already cooperated with different companies in that area. What are you most proud of in On-lang? I am super proud of being able to have fantastic people on board. We chose our teachers carefully and cooperate only with those, who have the same vision as we do  to help people break language barriers. I am very thankful for their support. The other thing I am proud of is that from this school-year we were able to offer job-contracts to some of our teachers. Though it is not the first choice of many schools, that usually employ freelancers only, we are happy to make a step forward and to make the job more stable for both our educators and ourselves. What are your hobbies and interests? I used to be a freelance photographer and that is still somewhere in my heart. I love visiting new places with my camera and taking photos. It helps to get a better, more detail-oriented perspective of a place one visits. That’s how it works for me at least 😊 What's your favorite spot in Luxembourg? Though I am relatively fresh in here, I can name a couple of spots I definitely love. From the city of Luxembourg I definitely fell in love with the Adolphe Bridge. Having a walk with the view is a breath-taking experience. It is also a perfect place to get away for a moment to be alone with ones thoughts sipping a good take-away coffee of course. What's your top 3-recommendations for a new comer in learning new language? 1. Surround yourself with the new language. Change language in your video games, phone system, Netflix default settings etc. Try to manage and don’t give up if it feels a bit upsetting or tiering at first. 2. Get professional help of a qualified teacher who can coach you through your language process. Even the best self-learning sportsmen need an assistance of a coach at some point. The same goes for the language skills, it really helps to have a professional teacher who cares about you, and your progress. Every student deserves a champion 😊 3. Go out there and use what you learn. Whenever it is possible for you, use the language you are learning. When you feel you are misunderstood, that’s why we have our hands and mimics, use them if you fail to find a word needed at the moment. The feeling of accomplishment when you manage to have a simple conversation in a language you are learning is an amazing motivator. What's your favorite quote? My favorite quote comes from one of my favorite TedTalks. It was given by a great educator Rita Pierson, who said: “Every child deserves a champion—an adult who will never give up on them, who understands the power of connection, and insists that they become the best that they can possibly be.” In On-lang, we believe that every our student, young or older deserves a champion 😊 What methods do you use teaching your students? We use a variety of teaching methods. Starting from Montessori/Multi-sensory methods for kids, through The Natural Approach, CLT (Communicative language learning), to our favorite – the Immersion method for adults. Actually what we like to do most is to tailor a mixture of various methods to our students. We definitely try to conduct our lessons completely in the target language as soon as it is possible. We also want to give our students the possibility to enjoy communication as early as  possible in their learning process – hence the focus on very practical, and useful skills. What would you say would be the recommendations of people who want to start their own business today? 1. The beginnings are never easy, so don’t give up to quickly. 2. Though you may often feel like this – don’t do everything by yourself. Try to get a support and to delegate tasks as soon as possible. 3. Gather positive people around you, and talk to them often to gain motivation to go on. Last, but not least, if you are not one yourself, find a good support of a tax advisor. I am very happy to have a support of Jegen Steuerberatungsgesellschaft GmbH from Bitburg, that provides fantastic support. Hope you enjoyed learning about Jacob and his family's entrepreneurial experience, which he has shared in a beautiful way. Are you learning a new language? check out On-lang and support local businesses in the greater region: luxembourgexpats.lu/local-business/books-languages-learning-and-training/1100001050

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Tips and tricks for renting a flat in Luxembourg

Luxembourg is notoriously expensive for renters. Why? The country is small and there are not so many houses to go around, which makes the demand for housing very high. Plus, Luxembourg attracts a continuous influx of people from overseas. Almost 50% of Luxembourg’s population comes from abroad, attracted by jobs in tech, finance, justice, and politics. Luxembourg is home to European Institutions, tech giants, such as Amazon, is one of the financial hubs of Europe, and hosts NATO offices. They provide employment opportunities and attract professionals from overseas to the Grand Duchy. When you prepare your move to Luxembourg, you have to take into account that renting prices are quite steep. In 2020, the average monthly rent for an apartment in Luxembourg City was 1,585 € and around 4000 € for a house. Given the scarcity of housing and the high prices, people relocating to Luxembourg are faced with the difficult task of finding a home. Here are a few tips and tricks on how to find and rent a flat in Luxembourg City. How to find an apartment for rent in Luxembourg City In Luxembourg, most landlords rent out their property via estate agents. If you find your apartment through an estate agent, you will have to pay a commission for their services that usually amounts to a month’s rent plus VAT. You can start by checking out rental agency websites, property portals, or expat Facebook groups. If you move to Luxembourg for your job, your company might arrange for a corporate serviced apartment in Luxembourg City. Or you can use the services of a relocation agency that can arrange for your accommodation, help with the bureaucracy involved by settling in another country, and even help you find a school for your kids. The Tenancy Agreement If you find an apartment that suits your needs, the next step is to sign the tenancy agreement (contrat de bail à loyer/ mietvertrag). Bear in mind that the contract will be in one of the official languages of Luxembourg: French, German, Luxembourgish. Make sure that you understand the terms of the contract and get a translator if needed. In Luxembourg, tenancy agreements for long-term rentals are for 1 to 3 years. You will need to pay a deposit that amounts to 1 to 3 months of rent, depending on the apartment, if it’s unfurnished or furnished. Most landlords will compile an inventory of the apartment that records its condition at the beginning of the tenancy. You will need to sign it and this will be used to settle any deductions for damages from your deposit. By law, the landlord is required to provide you with the energy performance certificate of the accommodation you are renting. Throughout the tenancy, the tenant will pay for utilities, maintenance, and common expenses if the flat is situated in a shared building. The tenant is also required to get home insurance. You should also be aware of the so-called ‘Painting Clause’ that implies that you will have to completely repaint the flat if you leave it before 3 years. Most landlords tend to add this clause by default and it could become expensive for you. If at all possible, insist on having the so-called ‘Diplomatic Clause’ added to your tenancy agreement. This will allow you to end the agreement before the end of the lease, but only if you need to leave Luxembourg for work. You also need to remember that, different from other countries, Luxembourg lease agreements are automatically renewed for at least 1 full year after the lease term unless stated otherwise. The short-term apartment  solution Given the challenge of finding a long-term rental that suits your needs, you might opt for temporary housing in Luxembourg, particularly for the first months following your move. Getting a short-term let will give you the respite to look for your long-term home in Luxembourg at ease.  The options vary from getting a room in a shared flat to renting a high-end corporate serviced apartment. These apartments come furnished and, in the latter case, with 24/7 on-call guest service and weekly housekeeping. The short-term let solution is particularly suitable for people who are relocated by their companies for work, who need to find accommodation quickly and be able to start at their new job as soon as possible. These are some of your renting options upon relocation to Luxembourg. If you opt for a short-term let, you might want to consider the services of a corporate housing provider operating in Luxembourg. With your temporary accommodation taken care of, you will be able to get to know that city and choose the area and the house that suits you best.

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ICT Spring 2021: the largest physical event of the year kept all its promises

ICT Spring 2021: the largest physical event of the year kept all its promises  On September 14 and 15, at the Europe Convention Center Luxembourg, in the heart of Europe, a new edition of the global tech conference ICT Spring was held. Organized by Farvest, this two day event composed of keynotes, roundtables, meetings and networking allowed experts, managers, start-ups and investors to meet and discuss topical issues and future trends in various sectors: ranging from FinTech to Space, including Cybersecurity, the digitalization of services, the Supply Chain and the development of the startups’ ecosystem at the international scale.  With 2.200+ people registered for this 2021 edition, 2350+ bilateral contacts made, 51 countries represented, 400+ meetings booked and 6000+ messages exchanged, ICT Spring kept all its promises.   Being the unmissable event since 2010 and supported by the Luxembourg government as well as an array of companies committed to the future of the tech world and of our society, ICT Spring, was the main event of the Digital ICT Week organized last September 13 to 17 by the Luxembourg Chamber of Commerce and Enterprise Europe Network.   As a consequence to the current health situation, ICT Spring took place in a hybrid format, with the possibility for attendees to join either on site or either to follow the conferences broadcasted live on a dedicated platform. Two intense days during which more than 220 high-level international speakers shared their expertise on major tech trends, their impact on society and the working world. In addition, more than 55 exhibitors met and exchanged with the 2021 springers while featuring their products and services in the exhibition hall.  True to its commitments and objectives, ICT Spring 2021 has encouraged emulation and networking between business leaders, decision makers, start-ups, researchers and VCs. The participants were pleased to exchange face-to-face after months of health crisis which prevented such meetings from being held, a real “first” for the country since March 2020. To offer a 360 event experience to its digital attendees, a networking platform was also implemented -allowing participants to participate in the matchmaking and targeted networking sessions- through the use of an internal application, generating more than 1500 meetings over the 2 days.  For its inauguration, the Mastermind Summit & Competition offered a brand new conference dedicated to entrepreneurs, VCs and startups. Featuring the best international start-ups in the tech world, Mastermind Competition rewarded 3 start-ups, at the forefront of innovation, active in Deeptech, Fintech and NewSpace. The winners of this first edition are: FIN-PAY from Australia (FinTech), Encapsulate from Canada (DeepTech) and Pale Blue from Japan (NewSpace).   Website: www.ictspring.com     ---------------------  French Version  ICT Spring Europe 2021 : le plus grand événement en présentiel de l'année a tenu toutes ses promesses  Les 14 et 15 septembre, à l'Europe Convention Center Luxembourg, au cœur de l'Europe, s'est tenue une nouvelle édition de la conférence technologique internationale ICT Spring. Organisé par Farvest, cet événement de deux jours composé de keynotes, tables rondes, rencontres et networking a permis aux experts, managers, start-ups et investisseurs d'échanger sur des sujets d'actualité et sur les tendances futures dans des secteurs variés : de la FinTech au spatial, en passant par la cybersécurité, la digitalisation des services, la Supply Chain et le développement de l'écosystème des startups à l'échelle internationale.  Avec plus de 2.200 personnes inscrites pour cette édition 2021, plus de 2.500 contacts bilatéraux, 51 pays représentés, plus de 400 rendez-vous professionnels planifiés et plus de 6.000 messages échangés, ICT Spring a tenu toutes ses promesses.  Rendez-vous incontournable depuis 2010, soutenu par le gouvernement luxembourgeois et tout un panel d'entreprises investies dans l'avenir de la tech et de notre société, ICT Spring était l'événement phare de la Digital ICT Week organisée du 13 au 17 septembre par la Chambre de Commerce du Luxembourg et Enterprise Europe Network.  Du fait de la situation sanitaire actuelle, ICT Spring s'est déroulé sous un format hybride, avec la possibilité pour les professionnels, soit d’assister à l’événement sur place, soit de suivre les conférences retransmises en direct sur internet grâce une plateforme dédiée. Le programme a consisté en deux journées intenses au cours desquelles plus de 220 intervenants internationaux de haut niveau ont partagé leur expertise sur les grandes tendances technologiques, leur impact sur la société et le monde du travail. En outre, plus de 55 exposants ont pu présenter leurs dernières innovations dans le hall d'exposition.  Fidèle à ses engagements et ses objectifs, ICT Spring Europe a favorisé l'émulation et le networking entre chefs d'entreprise, décideurs, startupers, chercheurs et investisseurs en capital-risque. Les participants ont eu le plaisir d'échanger en face-à-face après des mois de crise sanitaire qui ont empêché la tenue de telles rencontres, une véritable première pour le pays depuis mars 2020. Afin d’offrir une expérience événementielle à 360° ​​aux professionnels qui n’étaient pas présents sur place, une plateforme de networking a été mis en place, permettant des sessions de réseautage ciblées et du matchmaking grâce à l'utilisation d'une application interne, générant plus de 1500 meetings sur les deux jours.  Pour sa première, le Mastermind Summit & Competition a proposé une conférence dédiée aux entrepreneurs, investisseurs en capital-risque et startupers. Mettant en avant les meilleures start-up internationales de la tech, Mastermind Competition en a récompensé trois à la pointe de l'innovation, actives dans la Deeptech, la Fintech et le NewSpace. Les gagnants de cette première édition sont : l’australienne FIN-PAY (FinTech), la canadienne Encapsulate (DeepTech) et la japonaise Pale Blue (NewSpace).  Site internet : ww.ictspring.com  

Resources

Road resurfacing on Rue de Hamm

Road resurfacing works will be carried out on Rue de Hamm from 5:30 on Saturday, 11 September to 5:00 on Monday, 13 September 2021. Rue de Hamm will be closed to all traffic on the section of this road between No. 174 and Rue Englebert Neveu for the duration of these works. The Service Circulation (Traffic Department) will ensure proper signage is provided to inform road users. Please also note the following changes to the municipal bus service during the works: On line 9, all buses bound for Hamm will end their route at the stop "Ierzkaulen" (on Rue Englebert Neveu), which will serve as a temporary terminus. The stops "Hamm-Colonie", "Hamm-Schoul", "Hamm-Kierch", "Rue Haute", "Käschtewee" and "Rue de Bitbourg" will not be served. In the opposite direction, service to Bonnevoie and the city centre will begin at "Ierzkaulen". On line 15, all buses bound for Hamm will end their route at the temporary terminus "Hamm, Kierch" (temporary stop on Rue des Peupliers). The stops "Hamm-Schoul", "Hamm-Colonie" and "Ierzkaulen" will not be served. In the opposite direction, service to Fetschenhof and Clausen will begin at "Hamm, Kierch" ((temporary stop on Rue des Peupliers). On the CN3, all buses coming from Bonnevoie will end their route at "Englebert Neveu" before changing direction and travelling back towards Bonnevoie and the city centre. No service will be provided to Pulvermühl and the upper area of Hamm. The following stops in particular will be closed: "Hamm-Colonie", "Hamm-Schoul", "Hamm-Kierch", "Peupliers", "Pulvermühl", "Hammer Dällchen" and "Général Patton" For more info: Road resurfacing on Rue de Hamm | Ville de Luxembourg (vdl.lu) 

Education

Study (higher education) in Luxembourg

Luxembourg is a beautiful country sandwiched among Germany, France and Belgium. The country has one of the highest quality of lives, second richest in the world in GDP per capita, and one of the most expat friendly nations in the world; roughly half the Luxembourg population are expats. Luxembourg boasts a thriving finance, legal, and emerging tech industry. It has an advanced economy, and only a 6% unemployment rate, which is one of the lowest. There are a number of higher education options in Luxembourg. Importantly, with a thriving job market, upon graduation in Luxembourg, most students find full-time employment with a straight-forward work permit process. In addition, to become a naturalised Luxembourg citizen, you only need 5-years of residence (reduced from 7-years). This is one of the lowest requirements in Europe to become a citizen. As a Luxembourgish, EU Citizen, one can work and travel across all the European Union countries. And Luxembourg’ passport is accepted in more than 150 countries for visa-free travel. Now, lets get to the education part. University of Luxembourg is only about 20 years old, and is also ranked 20th in the World’s top young Universities by Times Education. Following are the list of Universities to check-in for higher education. University of Luxembourg: https://wwwen.uni.lu/ European Business University: ebu.lu United Business Institutes: https://www.ubi.edu/ BBI Luxembourg: https://www.bbi-edu.eu/ Sacred Heart University, Luxembourg: https://www.shu.lu/ Luxembourg School Of Business: https://luxsb.lu/ Business Science Institute: https://en.business-science-institute.com/ LUNEX International University of Health, Exercise and Sports: https://www.lunex-university.net/ CASS European Institute Of Management Studies: https://cass.edu.eu/ European Institute of Public Administration EIPA: https://www.eipa.eu/

Resources

Can I become a Luxembourg Citizen? Luxembourgish Citizenship

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a founding member of the European Union and being a Luxembourg citizen means you're also the citizen of the European Union. Luxembourgish passport is one of the most powerful with one can travel to 172 countries visa-free with Luxembourg passport. European Union citizens do not require any specific documentation to live and work in Luxembourg. However, people coming from outside of the European Union, commonly referred to as third-country nationals, who are adults and are looking to work here require a work-permit for establishing long-term residence in Luxembourg. The current population of Luxembourg is 634000 and is growing at more than 1% every year and is expected to soon reach a million. The country's GDP is strong, driven by the finance and associated industries. As the country grows from strength-to-strength, Luxembourg is also becoming home to many third-country nationals. In fact, 48000 non-EU residents are estimated to be in Luxembourg in 2000. Refer Statista statista.com/statistics/584918/foreigners-in-luxembourg-by-nationality Now, there are 10 ways to become a Luxembourg citizen, as listed here: guichet.public.lu/en/citoyens/citoyennete/nationalite-luxembourgeoise/acquisition-recouvrement/option.html In this post, we will focus on Case No. 7 - becoming a naturalised citizen of Luxembourg as an adult. You need to meet the following three requirements: 1. Legally resided in Luxembourg for at least 5 years. The final year of residence immediately preceding the option declaration must have been uninterrupted; 2. Have knowledge of the Luxembourgish language, as evidenced by a Luxembourgish language test pass certificate; 3. Have taken the "Vivre ensemble au Grand-Duché de Luxembourg" course or passed the test covering the topics taught in this course. These are basic requirements and is one of the most straightforward among the lowest residency requirement among the EU countries (Germany for example requires 8 years).

Business

Featured Story - Verena Miller (NextStop Luxembourg)

We are kicking-off the Featured Story Series (FSS) in your Luxembourg Expats Network. Our first conversation is with Verena Miller, Founder of NextStop Luxembourg. Here we begin... We are delighted to have you with us in FSS. FSS' ambition is to highlight the journey of our community members and create interesting conversations among our community and beyond. Welcome once again, let's get started :) A quick introduction about yourself: Hello, I’m Verena, born and raised in the North of Germany. What brings you to Luxembourg, and how has life in Luxembourg been? After being in the airline and hospitality industry for a decade, travelling to over 50 countries all around the world, living in different places in the UK as well as all over Germany, I relocated in 2018 to the heart of Europe - Luxembourg. This is where I live with my American husband and 1.5 year old son and call home. How did you get started with your entrepreneurial journey? Originally we came, like many other expats, for a job offer. I’m not gonna lie, I didn’t know much about the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg at all, I’ve never even been here before. The start of my Luxembourg journey was a bit rough, I faced many challenges. I tried to figure out the language system, citizen & car registration, different rules, geography, housing policies so on and so forth and it took some time but it all worked out after all and it’s been an adventurous and fun ride that always seems to have a surprise for me. My entrepreneurial journey started some years ago. I offered nutrition & mindset online coaching and enjoyed it a lot. Teaching how to change people’s life is so powerful and rewarding. At some point though, I realized my purpose lies in going out into the world and making a difference for other people. From many other expats as well as my own experience I knew how tough it can be to move to a new country, you might have never been to. Establishing a life in a country that’s so unique but also very foreign. Hoping to find a nice apartment or house to live in after arriving here immediately can be very disappointing. Attending appointments left and right and trying to figure out everything by yourself is not only stressful but also time consuming. Having someone who takes care of all of this, the whole package, no question unanswered makes one’s process much easier. What business services do you offer iand who should reach you? In cooperation with real estate agents, local companies and a small team of professionals, I strive to expedite and simplify your move to Luxembourg as smoothly as possible. Individuals and also businesses can depend on receiving a very personal and reliable service, with the individual but also family requirements being met. Next Stop Luxembourg will be there to assist you before, during and after your move, ensuring that you are well-settled in your new Luxembourg home. What hobbies / interests keep you busy outside of work? Nutrition & Cooking, Yoga, Nature, Events A favourite spot in Luxembourg? Petrusse Valley Top 3 Recommendations for new-comer? 1. Cafe Knopes for the most tasty Latte Macchiato in town, 2. Bambesch near Rollingergrund has beautiful hiking trails, 3. Merl Park ‘Pavillion’ for a summer sun-downer at the pond - (I recommend to book a table online) A favourite quote? Energy flows where intention goes It's great to speak with you Verena. We wish you a lot of success with NextStop Luxembourg and we are sure our community members will be inspired by your journey. Learn more about NextStop Luxembuorg luxembourgexpats.lu/business-listings/relocation/1100001030 nextstopluxembourg.com If you have an interesting story to be featured,  send us an expression of interest to team@luxexpats.lu.

Resources

Vaccination FAQ (19 May update)

The question on top of many people's mind is, when can I get vaccinated? When will I get the vaccine invite? As of today, 19 May, the folks in the age range around 40 yrs are expected to get a vaccination invite within the next few weeks. Is vaccination optional or mandatory? Vaccination is not mandatory and is only voluntary. Many people who get the vaccine invite are not showing up at the centre. Where are the vaccination centres? There are at least 6 new vaccination centres are added and are proceeding at a rapid pace. Check the list of vaccination centres here luxembourgexpats.lu/stories/resources/1100000692 What are the available vaccines? 1. Moderna 2. Pfizer 3. Astrazenica 4. Johnson and Johson Do I get to choose my vaccine? The doctor on-site makes the choice of which vaccine. You can refuse the vaccine choice but you cannot choose which vaccine. Of course you can try to request and see if the doctor is accomodating but in general, its really not your choice on which vaccine. What happens if I refuse my vaccine? You can refuse your vaccine. In this case, you will not be vaccinated at that point. But, you can register for the waiting list and you will be called at the end of the vaccination roll call. What are the ways I can get vaccinated? 1. You will get an invite in a roll call. You use the invite, register for an appointment, and show-up for the appointment with the invitation letter, appointment confirmation, ID card and Social Security card to get vaccinated. 2. You can register in the waiting list. This is outside of the roll call and you may get an invite earlier than the roll call. 3. You can also register for the "left over vaccine" list. As people are not showing up for their vaccine, you will be called at the end of the day from the centre for left over vaccines. You need to (a) stay within 20mins from the vaccination centre (b) you should register it every day. (Update: this option ended on 8 May and no longer an option)

Resources

Relocating to Luxembourg ? Read on for practical information

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also referred as Luxembourg, is sandwiched among three large countries, Germany, France and Belgium. Luxembourg’s population is around 615,000 with expats making almost half, 48% of the residents in Luxembourg. It’s a beautiful country, and its residents are multi-lingual with 2/3rd of Luxembourg’s residents speaking an average of 4 languages. Luxembourg’s dynamic economic has a dependence on expats and the country welcomes educated expats with high-salaries. The costs of Luxembourg tend to match the high-income potential of the residents, with real-estate prices growing at a healthy rate compared to other European countries. The conditions of entry and stay in Luxembourg differ depending on which is your home country. EU Nationals As Luxembourg is part of the Schengen area, nationals coming from the European Union, Switzerland and the European Economic Area (including Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway), do not require a visa to travel there. However, they will have to apply for a registration certificate at the nearest municipality to their place of residence in the country within three months following their arrival in the country if they intend to make a more than 90 days stay. The registration certificate is valid for lifetime. To apply for the registration certificate, the following is required: Passport Documents pertaining to the purpose of your stay in the country, whether you are a student, a trainee, an employee or an entrepreneur Proof of sufficient funds to support yourself and your family (if they are accompanying you) Non-EU Nationals Non-European Union nationals are advised to check whether they have to obtain a visa to enter the Schengen area depending on their home country. They should have a passport valid for at least 3 months following their travel date and at least 3 months after their visa's expiry date to be authorized to enter Luxembourg. Non-EU nationals have to register at the nearest municipality to their place of residence. In case they are staying in a hotel or tourist accommodation, the application can be filed there itself. The form must be filled and signed by the owner or manager and this document will serve as a statement of arrival. In the event of a stay of more than 3 months, they should have a residence permit issued before entering the territory. The request has to be made to the Luxembourg Ministry of Foreign Affairs' Directorate of Immigration (Foreign Service) Luxembourg laws differ for family members of European Union origin & for those of non-European nationals and those of students. In general, for spouses and civil partners as well as other family members relationship has to be supported by either of the following documents: marriage, partnership, relationship certificate or any other relevant document (issued in their home country) or a special authorization issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Whatever your home country and the duration of your stay, the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs is your contact point!  The steps, forms and conditions of entry can easily be accessed on guichet.lu & you can also find detailed information on the following topics: Housing Work & Employment Tax Health benefits Some general tips for expats are: Find a home. Housing is one of the hot topics for expats and locals alike in Luxembourg. Almost all properties are rented through agencies in Luxembourg.The standard agency fee, paid by the renting party, is 1 month rental + 17% VAT. If you’ve been referred by a previous tenant, the agency fee is halved(half-a-month rent) plus VAT. While this is the standard, there are also other ways to rent, particularly looking for properties via websites like www.LuxembourgExpats.lu/real-estate  and Facebook communities such as www.facebook.com/groups/luxembourghousing. There are owners directly renting their rooms and flats without “agency fees” Be affiliated with social security & apply for the social security card / European health insurance card. Once you arrive and are a full-time employee, you’re registered to CNS Health insurance. If you have a car & are looking to save on the cost of groceries, think about shopping in Germany or Belgium. But for one person, and non-bulk shopping, super markets in Luxembourg including Lidl, Delhaize, Auchan and the likes are the norm. If you are a married couple, you pay less tax (perhaps think about getting married) Luxembourg also accepts pacts, which serve as good as marriage for tax purposes. If you are looking to make friends, join expat groups, Facebook groups or meetups. People are friendly as they are all expats, but you have to try. Join number of Luxembourg Expats’ official communities luxembourgexpats.lu/stories/resources/1100000669 Avoid taxis at all cost – public transport is free!! But, early to or late from airports are usually for taxis. Some useful websites are: Luxembourg Official Portal www.luxembourg.public.lu Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs ' Immigration www.mae.lu Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs ' Short stay www.mae.lu/en/content/view/full/32678 Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs ' Luxembourg Diplomatic Missions www.mae.lu/Site-MAE/Missions-diplomatiques-et-consulaires Guichet.lu ' Local administrations in Luxembourg www.guichet.public.lu About Luxembourg Expats: Luxembourg Expats, or LuxExpats, was founded in 2012 as a Facebook community by expats for expats. We are now one of the largest home-grown marketplaces connecting local businesses and a social network for the growing expats community.

Resources

How to get a Driving Licence in Luxembourg?

You have decided to relocate in Luxembourg and you will probably want to drive. But can you drive with your original driving licence? If not, how to apply for a local driving licence? Read on to find the answers… Can you apply for registration or exchange your driving licence? It depends on the country where your driving licence was issued. 1. If you are from an EEA Member State: If your driving licence was issued by an EEA Member State (the European Economic Area includes the 28 EU Member States, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway), you can, at any time, exchange or register it at the Société Nationale de la Circulation Automobile (SNCA), that is the National Traffic Company. Registration is optional but highly recommended so that the Luxembourg authorities can quickly issue with a Luxembourg licence if your own licence is lost or stolen. Exchange is only mandatory in the event of an offence resulting in the restriction, suspension or cancellation of the licence or the loss of points. 2. If you are from a non-EEA Member State If your driving licence was issued by a non-EEA Member State, you are entitled to use your licence for a period of one year before having it transcribed, i.e. exchanged against a Luxembourg driving licence. 3. If you are applying for a learner's licence and registering for a Luxembourg licence the following information will be helpful. There are several main categories of driving licence & details can be obtained by visiting the website of the SNCA (www.snca.lu) To apply for a driving licence for a moped or light motorbike, the driver must be at least 16 years of age. To apply for a car driving licence, the driver must be at least 18 years old. A parent or guardian must sign application forms if the applicant is under 18. To qualify for any of these licences, a driver must pass two tests: 1. A theory test 2. A road/driving test Driving practice can only begin once the theory test is successfully completed. All driver training and preparation must be done through a registered driving school. An application for a driving licence for any licence category is made when registering with the driving school that sends the signed application to the SNCA. The following is required for application: 1. Medical certificate no more than three months old, provided by a licenced doctor 2. ID photograph 3. Certificate of residence no more than one month old, issued by the town hall 4. Copy of the affidavit issued by the police or from the country of origin if residency period in Luxembourg is under than five years 5. Tax stamp 6. The driving school registration fee The driving school will assist the applicants for the theory and driving tests including any other documents required. In the event of failure, exams can be taken as often as required provided the registration fees is paid and additional training is completed. The Luxembourg driving license has a period of validity & renewal is required depending on the category of licence obtained. Documents are also required when applying for renewal For any further detailed information, visit the website of the SNCA (www.snca.lu) and, for your administrative procedures online, guichet.lu (www.guichet.public.lu/citoyens/fr/transports-mobilite/index.html) Looking for a driving school? contact Yann luxembourgexpats.lu/business-listings/cars-motors-and-bicycles/1100000822

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